Brown County Mushroom Walk

October 22nd, 2011

For those of you who have been to southern Indiana during the Fall, a common destination is Brown County State Park. It is one of the most frequented state parks in the entire country, and is especially popular in the fall once the leaves begin to change. It averages over a million visitors a year. Pretty good for a state park. The area is very hilly, and there are several vista points in the park where you can see for miles across the tops of the trees. Below is a picture of me at one of the vistas earlier in the year. For some reason we didnt happen to get a picture of it today.  We didn’t even think about it, as even at this late date, the leaves are still not fully turned for the most part.
BCSP

The agenda for today was a mushroom walk that was an event on the Nature Center schedule. We limited the walk to one hour, as there was a hawk and owl show that was coming up after the walk. The walk was well attended, for a total count of 43 attendees. 47 people including us and two dogs.
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In the future, I may need to do a signup list and limit the walk to 20 or 30 people. The group was kind of large, but most left fulfilled. Especially since they got to find a Hen of the Woods. The one we found was growing under a Black Oak, and this was the second time that I have found one under a Black Oak this year. If you ask most people, they would say to look under White Oak, but also be sure to check out Black Oak as well. About half of the one we found was getting a little old, but it still made for a good presentation.
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The Hen of the Woods was the major find, but we were also able to come across alot of puffballs, Turkey Tails, and a nice stump of Mock Oysters – Phyllotopsis nidulans. The overall goal of this walk was to teach newcomers some of the basics to look for when identifying a mushroom – what substrate it grows on, whether it has pores, gills, teeth, etc.

After the Nature Center walk we went out for another hour and a half with some of the regulars who attend other Hoosier Mushroom Society events. Here is our total species list for the day. Not too impressive, but we were able to find a few new things for the people who came out.
Species List – October 22, 2011 – Brown County State Park – Nashville, IN

Discovery Trail

Trametes versicolor
Stereum ostrea
Grifola frondosa
Phyllotopsis nidulans
Trichaptum birforme
Lactarius sp.

Ogle Lake -> Nature Preserve

Galerina marginata
Herecium erinaceus
Trametes elegans
Lycoperdon pyriforme
Mycena galericulata
Xylobolus frustulatus
Hypoxylon fragiforme
Lycagala epidendrum
Tremella fuciformis
Pluteus cervinus
Schizophyllum commune
Phlebia radiata
Phlebia incarnata

Brought in (Nashville Area)

Armillaria tabescens
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Around Ogle lake, the beavers have taken over. They have dropped trees all around the lake. Recently, the DNR trapped and executed several of them, but there are still signs of recent beaver activity.
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This is one of the few deadly poisonous mushrooms in our area. It is called Galerina marginata. Look for it growing on downed wood. It will usually have rusty colored spores and a ring around the stem.
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Tremella fuciformis – White Jelly Mushroom. It has started to somewhat degrade in the middle. When it is really fresh, it looks like ice growing out the sides of logs.
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And I will leave you with a shot of Xylobolus frustulatus. Commonly found on dead wood. Didnt end up taking too many pictures today, as the park was really busy and I had to keep Kais on a leash. Hope to see you at a future event!


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Griffy Walk Species List

October 18th, 2011

October 18, 2011 – Griffy Woods – Bloomington, IN

Went out for a short walk today. It was fairly cool (under 50 degrees) and had been raining heavily early in the day. Three people came to this walk regardless of the weather. I was hoping for some of the fall mushrooms to start coming out, but alas, still nadda. Seeing much of the same things that have been out during the summer.

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The dull orange fungus is Phlebia radiata and the white is, I believe, a slime mold called Brefeldia maxima. I have found these two growing on the same log a number of times this year.

Xerula furfuracea
Pluteus cervinus
Pleurotus ostreatus
Trametes versicolor
Stereum ostrea
Stereum complicatum
Polyporus badius
Spongipellis pachyodon
Lycagala epidendrum
Panellus stipticus
Armillaria rhizomorphs
Trametes elegans
Polyporus alveolaris
Lenzites betulina
Lycoperdon pyriforme
Tremella mesenterica
Brefeldia maxima (maybe)
Phlebia radiata
Trichaptum biforme
Hypoxylon fragiforme

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Witches Butter – Tremella mesenterica

October Species List from Hoosier Mushroom Society


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More October Mushroom Events

October 11th, 2011

Ganoderma applanatum - Artists Conk

Ganoderma applanatum - Artists Conk

We had a good foray up near Lafayette on October 8th. Thanks to the Lafayette mushroom people who put it on. The remainder of our events for October will be around the Bloomington area, and we hope you can make it to one of them. Also be sure to check out the article on The Hoosier Mushroom Society in the Outdoor Section of the Bloomington Herald Times on October 16th!

Tuesday October 18th - Griffey Reservoir – Meet at large parking lot on north side of the lake at 5pm. 1.5 – 2 hour walk.
Thursday October 20th – RCA Community Park – Meet near large shelter at 5pm. 1-1.5 hour walk.
Saturday October 22nd - Brown County State Park Event – Meet at nature center at 1pm – 1.5 -2 hour walk.

As always, email steve@hoosiermushrooms.com with any questions.

And be sure to check out the post on our Facebook group for more frequent events in the Bloomington area.


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Lafayette Indiana Foray

October 11th, 2011

We had a really great time hitting the woods with our Lafayette mushroom friends, as well as meeting some new people from that area. We have been trying to move events for The Hoosier Mushroom Society around the state a bit more, and this was our third event away from the Bloomington/Brown County area. The others were at Indiana Dunes and Salamonie Reservoir.

We met at Tippecanoe Battlefield in Battleground, Indiana for the foray. We picked a great location, because right where everyone gathered to meet, there was one of the largest White Oaks I have ever seen with several Hen of the Woods around it in the landscaping. Made for a great picture.


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Heading over to the nearest picnic table to talk for a few minutes before we got started, we noticed a mushroom growing off the side of a picnic table. This is not very common with treated wood.

Gloeophyllum sepiarium

Gloeophyllum sepiarium



There were also a couple of Agaricus nearby. When these mushrooms are young, the gills are bright pink. By the time we found these, the the gill color had changed to become the actual color of the spores.Probably Agaricus campestris – The Field Mushroom.

Agaricus campestris

Agaricus campestris



Before we headed out, Ben (a local Lafayette mushroom hunter) showed us several of his collections that he had saved, including a jar full of morel mushrooms. It served to get us itching for spring already. He also had some Chanterelles, Chicken of the Woods, and Honey Mushrooms.

Morchella esculenta - Yellow Morel

Morchella esculenta - Yellow Morel

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So once we got out onto the foray, we came across several interesting mushrooms. The first interesting thing was a nice stash of Chicken of the Woods growing in the interior of a hollowed out Ash tree. I had not seen these growing nearly enclosed in a tree before, but it was pretty cool.

Chicken of the Woods

Chicken of the Woods



Continuing on,we found an Entoloma growing in the woods. I usually call this Entoloma strictius. It has a stem that is twisted…like someone gave it an Indian burn. Look for that, pink gills, and growing on the ground.

A quick story…later in the foray, someone held up a mushroom and a couple of us agreed that it looked like Pluteus cervinus – The Deer Mushroom. We were planning to go to the Purdue Herbarium later in the day, so we saved it to look at its unique microscopic characters. More on that later…


Entoloma sp.

Entoloma sp.



Some of the most common decomposers you will find are of the Genus Gymnopus. They are “Collyboid” mushrooms that have a smooth cartilaginous stem. With these, the stem is much darker than the cap, and they grow in clusters. So I am calling it Gymnopus acervatus.

Gymnopus acervatus

Gymnopus acervatus



Coming up next we found a few mycena. This genus has small white-spored mushrooms that grow from wood.

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Mycena galericulata

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Mycena galericulata



And another small mushroom that I have been finding all over the place early in the fall. It is a Lepiota – White spores, terrestrial, and a ring around the stem. This one is Lepiota cristata. I made a page for it on hoosiermushrooms.org, so be sure to check it out. I will update it with the may different growth forms eventually. One interesting thing about this mushroom is that it has spores shaped like bullets.

Lepiota cristata

Lepiota cristata

Frogitty frog

Frogitty frog

Maggie reaching for a giant puffball

Maggie reaching for a giant puffball



Maggie had her glasses stored in that hole in her jeans, rubbed up against a Pokeberry plant, and somehow managed to get some of the berries into her jeans. The stain came out tho.

Pokeberry stain

Pokeberry stain



Finally we ended our mushroom day with a trip over to the herbarium at the Purdue University Campus. I didnt bring in my camera, so all I got was this cellphone shot. If someone has a picture of the collection storage room, please send it to me and I will update the post. Hope you enjoy!

Purdue Herbarium

Purdue Herbarium



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HMS 2011 Schedule

January 10th, 2011

We are going to have quite a busy year with The Hoosier Mushroom Society. We will get together nearly every month for a foray somewhere in the state. A tentative schedule for the upcoming year follows. Please email us at steve@hoosiermushrooms.com with your input, as some small changes are likely to occur. This schedule should allow those interested in the organization from different parts of the state to have an event they can attend nearby, and will allow others to get out and see the many special places Indiana has to offer.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (THERE WILL LIKELY BE CHANGES)

Hoosier Mushroom Society Events

Month of April – Will be heading out into the woods nearly every afternoon in the Bloomington area.
April 9 - HMS Presentation – Tom Nauman from Morel Mania in Bloomington.
April 16 – HMS Foray – Morel Search at Brown County State Park – Nashville, IN
May 21st – HMS Foray – Yellowood State Forest – Bloomington, IN
July16 -  HMS Foray – Salamonie Reservoir – Andrews, IN
Aug.  27 – HMS Foray – Northwest Indiana Foray – Dunes State Park
Sept. 3 – HMS Foray – Yellowood State Forest – Bloomington, IN
Sept. 24 – HMS Foray – Brown County State Park – Nashville, IN
October 8 – HMS Foray – Lafayette, IN Area
October 22 – HMS Late-Season Foray – Eagle Creek – Indianapolis, IN

Other Events of Interest

February 19 – Winter Tree ID workshop – Brown County State Park – 10am to noon
March 28 - “The First Morel” — a mushroom presentation by Don Ruch, Biology Professor at Ball State – West Lafayette, IN
April 30 – May 1 - Morel Festival in Mansfield, IN
May 7th - Morel Festival at Brown County State Park
August 1-6 – Mycological Society of America Meeting – Fairbanks,  AK
August 5-7 - North American Mycological Association Foray (NAMA) – Western Pennsylvania  *Recommend*
August 11-14 – North East Mycological Federation (NEMF) Foray – New York
August 18-21 – Telluride Mushroom Festival – Telluride, CO
September 17-18The Hoosier Outdoor Experience – Fort Harrison SP – Indianapolis, IN

We generally plan on camping out at each of these HMS Foray events that occur in reasonable temperatures. The poor weather replacement day will be on the day after the scheduled foray listed.

If you attend state parks often, or are considering attending several of our events, I would suggest purchasing a DNR annual entrance permit.

Also, if you are looking to go out into the woods on a more frequent basis. There will be numerous afternoon opportunities to go out into the woods in the Bloomington area. Just send an email, and let us know that you are interested.


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